• Nathan Price, pasteur baptiste américain au fanatisme redoutable, part en mission au Congo belge en 1959 avec sa femme et ses quatre filles.

  • Dans le décor sauvage et grandiose des Appalaches, Un été prodigue tisse trois histoires de femmes.

  • Dans ce nouveau roman, Barbara Kingsolver interroge la place des femmes dans la famille et dans l'histoire à travers deux héroïnes : Willa Knox, journaliste indépendante qui doit aider son fils en pleine crise existentielle et Mary Treat, scientifique émérite largement oubliée malgré sa proximité intellectuelle avec Darwin. Ce qui lie les deux femmes : un charisme irrésistible, un intense besoin de liberté et... une maison. D'une époque à l'autre, du XXIe siècle au XIXe siècle, Barbara Kingsolver dresse un portrait saisissant de vérité de l'Amérique, mêlant avec brio le romanesque et le politique. 

  • Après L'Arbre aux haricots, le lecteur est entraîné dans un monde d'amour quelquefois douloureux où l'image de la famille est mise à mal.

  • Conscients des périls qui menacent la planète, Barbara Kingsolver et sa famille ont décidé de s'installer dans une ferme dans les Appalaches et de devenir des locavores.

  • Taylor Greer n'a pas l'intention de finir ses jours dans le Kentucky, où les filles commencent à faire des bébés avant d'apprendre leurs tables de multiplication. Le jour où elle quitte le comté de Pittman au volant de sa vieille coccinelle Volkswagen, elle est bien décidée à rouler vers l'Ouest jusqu'à ce que sa voiture rende l'âme. C'est compter sans le désert de l'Oklahoma où. sur le parking d'un bar miteux, elle hérite d'un mystérieux balluchon : une petite Indienne. On est à Tucson dans I'Arizona ; Taylor a les yeux grands ouverts, de l'énergie à revendre et une bonne dose d'humour. Dans un garage un peu spécial, elle va rencontrer à la fois la générosité et l'inacceptable, et trouver l'espoir de garder celle qui est devenue son enfant, la petite Turtle. L'Arbre aux haricotsest une histoire de rire et de peine, un magnifique début pour une nouvelle romancière contemporaine. La suite des aventures de Turtle et de sa mère a été publiée sous le titre Les Cochons au paradis.

  • Né aux Etats-Unis, élevé au Mexique, Harrison William Shepherd n'a jamais trouvé de foyer. Les petits carnets qu'il tient chaque jour sont sa seule raison d'être.

  • Dans les Appalaches, au coeur de la forêt, Dellarobia Turnbow aperçoit une lumière aveuglante. Ce sont les ailes de centaines de papillons. Cette étrange apparition devient un enjeu collectif. Dellarobia comprend que de simples papillons vont bouleverser sa vie, et peut-être l'ordre du monde.

  • Codi revient à Grace, petite ville de l'Arizona, où elle a grandi pour s'occuper de son père malade.

  • En douze nouvelles tendres et drôles, Barbara Kingsolver nous livre un hymne au bonheur de vivre en reprenant ses thèmes de prédilection : défense de la nature, souci des enfants, sagesse des Indiens, fragilité et force des femmes.

  • Au lendemain des attentats du 11 septembre 2001 qui ont endeuillé les Etats-Unis, la romancière a été sollicitée pour partager ses émotions et ses réflexions.

  • The Lacuna is the heartbreaking story of a man's search for safety of a man torn beween the warm heart of Mexico and the cold embrace of 1950s McCarthyite America.Born in the U.S. and reared in Mexico, Harrison Shepherd is a liability to his social-climbing flapper mother, Salomé. Making himself useful in the household of the famed Mexican artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, and exiled Bolshevik leader Lev Trotsky, young Shepherd inadvertently casts his lot with art and revolution. A violent upheaval sends him north to a nation newly caught up in World War II. In the mountain city of Asheville, North Carolina he remakes himself in America's hopeful image. But political winds continue to throw him between north and south, in a plot that turns many times on the unspeakable breach - the lacuna - between truth and public presumption. A gripping story of identity, loyalty and the devastating power of accusations to destroy innocent people. The Lacuna is as deep and rich as the New World.

  • Barbara Kingsolver opens her home to us, as she and her family attempt a year of eating only local food, much of it from their own garden. With characteristic warmth, Kingsolver shows us how to put food back at the centre of the political and family agenda. Animal, Vegetable, Miracle is part memoir, part journalistic investigation, and is full of original recipes.

  • The Poisonwood Bible tells the story of an American family in the Congo during a time of tremendous political and social upheaval. The story is told by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, a fierce evangelical Baptist who takes his family and mission to the Belgian Congo in 1959. They carry with them all they believe they will need from home, but soon find that all of it - from garden seeds to Scripture - is calamitously transformed on African soil. This tale of one family's tragic undoing and remarkable reconstruction, over the course of three decades in postcolonial Africa, is set against one of history's most dramatic political parables. The Poisonwood Bible dances between the darkly comic human failings and inspiring poetic justices of our times. In a compelling exploration of religion, conscience, imperialist arrogance, and the many paths to redemption, Barbara Kingsolver has written a novel of overwhelming power and passion.

  • Prodigal Summer weaves together three stories of human love within a larger tapestry of lives inhabiting the forested mountains and struggling small farms of southern Appalachia. From her outpost in an isolated mountain cabin, Deanna Wolfe, a reclusive wildlife biologist, watches a den of coyotes that have recently migrated into the region. She is caught off guard by a young hunter who invades her most private spaces and confounds her self-assured, solitary life. On a farm several miles down the mountain, Lusa Maluf Landowski, a bookish city girl turned farmer's wife, finds herself unexpectedly marooned in a strange place where she must declare or lose her attachment to the land that has become her own. And a few more miles down the road, a pair of elderly feuding neighbours tend their respective farms and wrangle about God, pesticides, and the possibilities of a future neither of them expected. Over the course of one humid summer, these characters find their connections to one another and to the flora and fauna with whom they share a place. Prodigal Summer demonstrates a balance of narrative, drama and ideas that is characteristic of Barbara Kingsolver's finest work.

  • In this collection of essays, the author of High Tide in Tucson brings to us (out of one of history's darker moments) an extended love song to the world we still have. From its opening parable gleaned from recent news about a lost child saved in an astonishing way, the book moves on to consider a world of surprising and hopeful prospects ranging from an inventive conservation scheme in a remote jungle to the backyard flock of chickens tended by the author's small daughter. Whether she is contemplating the Grand Canyon, her vegetable garden, motherhood, adolescence, genetic engineering, TV-watching, the history of civil rights, or the future of a nation founded on the best of all human impulses, these essays are grounded in the author's belief that our largest problems have grown from the earth's remotest corners as well as our own backyards, and that answers may lie in those places, too. In the voice Kingsolver's readers have come to rely on - sometimes grave, occasionally hilarious, and ultimately persuasive - Small Wonder is a hopeful examination of the people we seem to be, and what we might yet make of ourselves.

  • Over landscapes ranging from northern California and the urban Southwest to the hills of eastern Kentucky and the Caribbean island of St Lucia, Barbara Kingsolver tells stories of hope, momentary joy and powerful endurance. In every setting her characters are bound by a strong sense of place and the compelling ties of love and family history: a child accepts the impossible responsibility of remembering her Cherokee great-grandmother's dying culture; a quietly dissolving couple must fight ghosts of past expectations to reach one another; a tough Mexican American woman finds herself in jail because of her commitment to a family legacy of 'doing the right thing.' With disarming honesty - at times comic but often heartrending - Barbara Kingsolver creates a world of love and possibility into which the reader is irresistibly drawn.

  • "The flames now appeared to lift from individual treetops in showers of orange sparks, exploding the way a pine log does in a campfire when it is poked. The sparks spiralled upward in swirls like funnel clouds. Twisters of brightness against grey sky."On the Appalachian Mountains above her home, a young mother discovers a beautiful and terrible marvel of nature: the monarch butterflies have not migrated south for the winter this year. Is this a miraculous message from God, or a spectacular sign of climate change. Entomology expert, Ovid Byron, certainly believes it is the latter. He ropes in Dellarobia to help him decode the mystery of the monarch butterflies.Flight Behaviour has featured on the NY Times bestseller list and is Barbara Kingsolver's most accessible novel yet.

  • With the eyes of a scientist and the vision of a poet, Barbara Kingsolver explores her trademark themes of family, community and the natural world. Defiant, funny and courageously honest, High Tide in Tucson is an engaging and immensely readable collection from one of the most original voices in contemporary literature. 'Possessed of an extravagantly gifted narrative voice, Kingsolver blends a fierce and abiding moral vision with benevolent and concise humour. Her medicine is meant for the head, the heart, and the soul.' New York Times Book Review

  • When six-year-old Turtle Greer witnesses a freak accident at the Hoover Dam, her insistence on what she has seen, and her mother's belief in her, lead to a man's dramatic rescue. But Turtle's moment of celebrity draws her into a conflict of historic proportions. The crisis quickly envelops not only Turtle and her mother, Taylor, but everyone else who touches their lives in a complex web connecting their future with their past. Pigs in Heaven travels the roads from rural Kentucky and the urban Southwest to Heaven, Oklahoma, and the Cherokee Nation, testing the boundaries of family and the many separate truths about the ties that bind. It is a spellbinding novel of heartbreak and love.

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