Littérature générale

  • Trente ans après Le Meilleur des mondes, Aldous Huxley revient sur ce roman phare de la science-fiction pour constater que l'évolution qu'il imaginait dans les années 1930 se révèle une véritable prédiction.
    Le monde qu'il a vu émerger - la dictature scientifique, l'homme transformé en esclave amoureux de sa servitude, la montée des fanatismes, le cauchemar de l'organisation intégrale - est déjà en train de prendre forme sous ses yeux à la fin des années 1950.
    Dans cet essai d'une étonnante lucidité, il nous offre un regard percutant sur les évolutions sociales et politiques de son temps.

  • Anglais Antic Hay

    Aldous Huxley

    When Theodore Gumbril hits upon the notion of designing a type of pneumatic trouser ('a comfort to all travellers, indispensable to first-nighters, the concert-goers' friends') to ease the discomfort of the sedentary life, he decides the time has come leave his position as a housemaster in a boys' public school and seek his fortune in the metropolis. But post-First-World-War London seems to be gripped by a fever of hedonism. Gumbril is soon caught up in the delirious world of aesthetes extraordinaire Mercaptan, Casimir Lypiatt and the thoroughly civilised Myra Viveash, and finds his burning ambitions are beginning to lose their urgency-A contemporary commentator coined the word 'futilitarian' to describe the type of desultory, pleasure-seeking intellectual Huxley pinned so mercilessly to the literary map in Antic Hay. Wickedly funny and deliciously barbed, the novel epitomises the glittering neuroticism of its decade.

  • In his 1932 classic dystopian novel, Brave New World, Aldous Huxley depicted a future society in thrall to science and regulated by sophisticated methods of social control.Nearly thirty years later in Brave New World Revisited, Huxley checked the progress of his prophecies against reality and argued that many of his fictional fantasies had grown uncomfortably close to the truth.Brave New World Revisited includes Huxley's views on overpopulation, propaganda, advertising and government control, and is an urgent and powerful appeal for the defence of individualism still alarmingly relevant today.

  • The dilettantes who frequent Lady Tantamount's society parties are determined to push forward the moral frontiers of the age. Marjorie has left her family to live with Walter; Walter is in love with the luscious but cold-hearted Lucy who devours every man in sight; the repulsive Spandrell deflowers young girls for the sake of entertainment and all the while everyone is engaged in dazzling and witty conversation.

  • In 1953, in the presence of an investigator, Aldous Huxley took four-tenths of a gramme of mescalin, sat down and waited to see what would happen. When he opened his eyes everything was transformed. Huxley described his experience in The Doors of Perception and its sequel Heaven and Hell.

  • Anthony Beavis is a man inclined to recoil from life. His past is haunted by the death of his best friend Brian and by his entanglement with the cynical and manipulative Mary Amberley. Realising that his determined detachment from the world has been motivated not by intellectual honesty but by moral cowardice, Anthony attempts to find a new way to live. Eyeless in Gaza is considered by many to be Huxley's definitive work of fiction.

  • In 1634 Urbain Grandier, a handsome and dissolute priest of the parish of Loudun was tried, tortured and burnt at the stake. He had been found guilty of conspiring with the devil to seduce an entire convent of nuns in what was the most sensational case of mass possession and sexual hysteria in history. Grandier maintained his innocence to the end and four years after his death the nuns were still being subjected to exorcisms to free them from their demonic bondage. Huxley's vivid account of this bizarre tale of religious and sexual obsession transforms our understanding of the medieval world.

  • In a renovated Italian palace set above the blue of the sea, the Junoesque figure of Mrs Aldwinkle moves among her guests. These include a poet who earns his living editing The Rabbit Fancier's Gazette; a popular novelist who records every detail of her affair with another guest as future literary material; an aging philosopher who pursues a wealthy yet mentally-disabled heiress and a pair of na-ve and charming young lovers. Deliciously satirical, Those Barren Leaves bites the hands of those who dare to posture or feign sophistication and is as comically fresh today as when it was first published.

  • Anglais Grey Eminence

    Aldous Huxley

    The life of Father Joseph, Cardinal Richelieu's aide, was a shocking paradox. After spending his days directing operations on the battlefield, Father Joseph would pass the night in prayer, or in composing spiritual guidance for the nuns in his care. He was an aspirant to sainthood and a practising mystic, yet his ruthless exercise of power succeeded in prolonging the unspeakable horrors of the Thirty Years War. In his masterful biography, Huxley explores how an intensely religious man could lead such a life and how he could reconcile the seemingly opposing moral systems of religion and politics.

  • Anglais Brave New World

    Aldous Huxley

    Far in the future, the World Controllers have created the ideal society. Through clever use of genetic engineering, brainwashing and recreational sex and drugs all its members are happy consumers. Bernard Marx seems alone in feeling discontent. Harbouring an unnatural desire for solitude, and a perverse distaste for the pleasures of compulsory promiscuity, Bernard has an ill-defined longing to break free. A visit to one of the few remaining Savage Reservations where the old, imperfect life still continues, may be the cure for his distress-Huxley's ingenious fantasy of the future sheds a blazing light on the present and is considered to be his most enduring masterpiece.

  • It is Christmas Eve, and John Rivers is thinking about the past; about his sheltered upbringing; about an extraordinary time spent as a lab assistant to the great physicist Henry Maartens; about Maartens' beautiful wife, Katy, and about a love affair which shook Rivers to the core and caused him to question everything he once revered.

  • Jo Stoyle is afraid of death. But Stoyle is also a millionaire, and so he pours his riches into scientific research, desperate to find the secret of immortality. This ruthless quest will enmesh everyone around him in a web of greed, seduction, murder and debasement. Written while he was living in California, this is Huxley's response to Hollywood's superficiality and obsession with youth, a powerful cautionary tale which employs all his customary wit and merciless insight.

  • Sebastian Barnack, a handsome English schoolboy, is on bad terms with his socialist father who disapproves of his hedonistic lifestyle. He escapes to Florence in order to learn about life. His education there, thanks to the contradictory influences of his scurrilous Uncle Eustace and a saintly bookseller, is both sacred and profane. A haunting novel from one of the twentieth century's most powerful commentators.

  • Le chef d'oeuvre d'Aldous Huxley Le Meilleur des Mondes, se lit et se relit, intemporel, visionnaire, absolument génial. Découvrez ou redécouvrez-le dans cette édition numérique inédite, suivi de Retour au meilleur des mondes, un texte plus pamphlétaire, écrit trente ans après l'oeuvre originale dont il poursuit le propos.

    Le Meilleur des Mondes 632 après Ford : désormais on compte les années à partir de l'invention de la voiture à moteur. La technologie et la science ont remplacé la liberté et Dieu. La vie humaine, anesthésiée, est une suite de satisfactions, les êtres naissent in vitro, les désirs s'assouvissent sans risque de reproduction, les émotions et les sentiments ont été remplacés par des sensations et des instincts programmés. La société de ce Meilleur des mondes est organisée, hiérarchisée et uniformisée, chaque être, rangé par catégorie, a sa vocation, ses capacités et ses envies, maîtrisées, disciplinées, accomplies. Chacun concourt à l'ordre général, c'est-à-dire travaille, consomme et meurt, sans jamais revendiquer, apprendre ou exulter. Mais un homme pourtant est né dans cette société, avec, chose affreuse, un père et une mère et, pire encore, des sentiments et des rêves. Ce " Sauvage ", qui a lu tout Shakespeare et le cite comme une Bible, peut-il être un danger pour le " monde civilisé " ?
    Retour au meilleur des mondes Trente ans après Le Meilleur des mondes, Aldous Huxley revient sur ce roman phare de la science-fiction pour constater que l'évolution qu'il imaginait dans les années 1930 se révèle une véritable prédiction.
    Le monde qu'il a vu émerger - la dictature scientifique, l'homme transformé en esclave amoureux de sa servitude, la montée des fanatismes, le cauchemar de l'organisation intégrale - est déjà en train de prendre forme sous ses yeux à la fin des années 1950.
    Dans cet essai d'une étonnante lucidité, il nous offre un regard percutant sur les évolutions sociales et politiques de son temps.

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